Hisham

HISHAM
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“I went there once, it’s not far from here, only a half hour away but it was illegal.”

Hisam’s first film was about his grandfather, a 97 year old man forced out of his village when he was 30. Hisham describes his grandfathers home as a beautiful open space with trees, grass, and an iron gate.

Camera gear bounces on the back seat of the taxi as it takes a detour. Another man was shot yesterday and the soldiers have decided to close the main road.

His tired eyes look calmly ahead, carrying with it the burden of his granfathers memory for a place he could never return. There are no trees or open spaces in the camp, just people stuggling to continue living in a prison that was once their land.

For Hisham, this knowing eats away at him becuase he know’s no answers. He has no way out except through his camera and rthough his camera he bings to understand more about his own history and people but more importantly more about himsef.

“I want the world to know there are people who live in places like this but theya re good people just like you.”

Hisham arrives in a feild in rural Jerico and he bgins filming a woman picking tomatos. Today he’s making a short film to empower women in the commnity to be entreprenuerial.

There are no simple answers for a man trapped in his own land. Hisham is left only with his desire to understand. To understand his own history, his own people and his own struggle through the lens of his camera.
Hisham is applying for an opportunity to take a class in jornalism in Washington DC. For him it’s not only a chance to the the world outside of his camp but also learn something to bring back to his camp.

Hisham is preparing himself to visit wachington\

Hisham saw the outside world once in an exchange prgram to Euope and for the first time he began to understand what life was like without checkpoints and soldiers. He brought back with him a new perspective one his situation, one which he could use to understand and capture the lives, history and tradition around him.
Like Hisam he had seen what not many people in the camp get to see. A place without solders or checkpont, a place where you could visit the sea. Hisham could never have this in Palestine but he did get the chance to visit Europe once in a exchange program and like his granfathe’s villiage eveything seemed to embody a magical quality and wonder. He had seen how the outside world lived and retuned with a different lense of the life he was born into.
had tasted freedom and knew the consiquensed of its short term infatuation.

Hishams freedom came when he was offered the opptounity to do an exchange prohram in Europe. It wasnt the freedom he felt visiting his original village now taken over by settlers, it was the freedom he felt when he had the oppotunity to participate in an exchange program to go to Bonisa and France.

How people lived outside of the West Bank was an intocating feeling for him. He’d never seen the ocean from his country but he could in these foreign places. He could go to the grocery store at night and not worry about being shot by soldeirs. With every expericne and moment he savored he also brought back with him more realization for the loss of what his community didnt have. It was a double edged sword becuase his freedom was only temporary. The more se saw outside the camp the more he relaized he didnt have

Having realized fredom, having tasting it brought with is consequences, Knowing what could be what is not, knowing the unecessary pain of what it feels liek to be prisoner. This pain he saw in others like he saw in his grandfather and he saught to understand them. He needed to find a way to capture them.

It brought back more questions. It dint make his life any easier. With the knowlege of the thsese freedomws brought back more confusion.

be famers and never fathom the thought of living in camps. He considered his best friend. , to know of an unreachable place where he could be free.

We need to go another way, the soldiers closed the road becuase of a shooting yesterday. He doesnt know the circumstances or details but it was a reminder of the place he lived and the
He couldnt erase thelittle details so, he couldnt understand why
Hisham’s camera gear is bouncing in the back seat of the taxi as the car swerves onto a dirt road. His tired eyes take in the road for a while and then he turns back around with a smile.

“Are you hungry?”

Hisham is on his way to Jerico, about two hours away from his camp in the West Bank. He’s making a short film with a community there to empower women.

He’s calm and looking ahead as the taxi passes cars to avoid the importu checkpoint. He’s on his way to make a video witha  commnuity in Jerico and it looks as if he hasnt slept for weeks and the weight of the camp rests on his pale green eyes. It’s not the solders or the rocks or children that get taken at night, its that he see’s what the outside world doesn’t: that there are people living here, good people just like him.  Hisham is reserved but chearful, the camera

 

 

The weight of the camp rests on Hisham’s pale green eyes, as if he hasn’t slept for weeks. He’s trying to listen, understand, and find answers but the camera never explains why he cant visit the sea or  with every wave of martyrs, tear gas and nightly attacks life becomes even more unbearable in Dheisheh camp. The outside world must know what’s happening here, not just to see the history and culture quickly and forcibly vanishing away but to also see a place where human beings continue to endure unimaginable circumstances. They are kind people, people like Hisham who just want to live.

His first film was about his 97 year old grandfather and the events that forced him to flee his original village 67 years ago. A place Hisham describes with almost magical qualities, beautiful green fields, tall trees and a rusty iron gate. Its a place he’s never known but only 30minutes away. Today Hisham describes his vision for a new film about the history of the camp one that involves stories from each of the three generations that now live here. He doesn’t know where to start, surviving is hard enough but somehow it’s the stories that makes him feel alive.

 

 

 

The weight of the camp rests on Hisham’s pale green eyes, as if he hasn’t slept for weeks. He’s trying to listen, understand, and find answers but the camera never explains why he cant visit the sea. With every new wave of martyrs, tear gas and nightly attacks life becomes even more unbearable in Dheisheh camp. He sees a history and culture quickly and forcibly vanishing away but more importantly he sees a place where human beings like himself continue to endure unimaginable circumstances.
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Today he wants the world to know about the history if his camp, a film that will include stories from each of the three aging generations that live here. Stories like that of his 97 year old grandfather and the events that forced him to flee his original village 67 years ago. It’s place Hisham describes with almost magical qualities, beautiful green fields, tall trees and a rusty iron gate but it’s a place he’s never known. People in Dheisheh camp don’t live, they survive but for a quiet young man it’s in the stories where he feels most alive.

 

 

 

The weight of the camp rests on Hisham’s pale green eyes, as if he hasn’t slept for weeks. He’s trying to listen, understand, and find answers but it takes a toll on him and the camera never explains why he can’t visit the sea. A new wave of martyrs, tear gas and nightly attacks have arrived this month and life becomes even more unbearable in Dheisheh camp. It’s the stories he’s trying to capture here that are now quickly and forcibly vanishing away.
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He wants the world to know about the people here as human beings that have so little but enormous hearts. It’s the culture and the history if his camp people don’t often see. Stories similar to his first documentary which included his 97 year old grandfather and the original village he left 67 years ago. It’s a place Hisham describes with almost magical qualities, beautiful green fields, tall trees and a rusty iron gate but it’s a place he’s never known. He is a refugee, quiet but hopeful, a prisoner in his own country fighting to live in the stories of his people.

 

 

The weight of the camp rests on Hisham’s pale green eyes, as if he hasn’t slept for weeks. He’s trying to listen, understand, and find answers but it takes a toll on him and the camera never explains why he can’t visit the sea. A new wave of martyrs, tear gas and nightly attacks have arrived this month and life becomes even more unbearable in Dheisheh camp. It’s the stories he’s trying to capture here that are now quickly and forcibly vanishing away.

<br></br><br></br>

He wants the world to know about the people here as human beings. It’s the culture and the history people outside his camp don’t get to see. Stories similar to his first documentary which included his 97-year-old grandfather the home he left 67 years ago. It’s a place Hisham describes with almost magical qualities, beautiful green fields, tall trees and a rusty iron gate but it’s a place he’s never known. He is a refugee, quiet yet hopeful, a prisoner in his own country fighting but its in the stories he feels most free.

 

 

 

HISHAM – Ann frank

 

The weight of the camp rests on Hisham’s pale green eyes, as if he hasn’t slept for weeks. He’s trying to listen, understand, and find answers but it takes a toll on him and the camera never explains why he can’t visit the sea. A new wave of martyrs, tear gas and nightly attacks have arrived this month and life becomes even more unbearable in Dheisheh camp. It’s the stories he’s trying to capture here that are now quickly and forcibly vanishing away.

 

He wants the world to know about the people here as human beings. It’s the culture and the history people outside his camp don’t get to see. Stories similar to his first documentary which included his 97-year-old grandfather the home he left 67 years ago. It’s a place Hisham describes with almost magical qualities, beautiful green fields, tall trees and a rusty iron gate but it’s a place he’s never known. He is a refugee, quiet yet hopeful, a prisoner in his own country fighting but its in the stories he feels most free.

 

The weight of the camp rests on Hisham’s pale green eyes as if he hasn’t slept for weeks. He’s trying to listen, understand, and find answers but it takes a toll on him and the camera never explains why he can’t visit the sea. A new wave of martyrs, tear gas and nightly attacks have arrived this month and life becomes even more unbearable in Dheisheh camp. It’s the stories he’s trying to capture here but they quickly and forcibly vanishing away.
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Hisham desperately wants to believe things will change if the world sees the people here as human beings. His 97-year-old grandfather was the subject of his first film and in it he captures the subtle pain of man who has spend most of his life away from home. It’s a place Hisham describes with almost magical qualities, beautiful green fields, tall trees and a rusty iron gate but it’s a place he’ll never know. He is a refugee, quiet yet hopeful, a prisoner in his own land but it’s in the stories like these that he feels free.